ANNIE ELAINEY

Some Behind-The-Scenes clips of my day hair modeling, my radio show LOVEBOX, and then a tour of Wynwood Brewery!

huffingtonpost:

HERE’S WHAT ‘YELLOW FEVER’ REALLY MEANS

"All my ex-girlfriends are Asian."

If you’ve ever come across this charming come-on, you’ve probably been exposed to yellow fever

For her full rant watch the video here.

bethanycantdraw:

Triple discrimination threat. 

Almost 600 subscribers!! Go subscribe now! Or don’t!! Be like that then!
http://youtube.com/theannieelainey
A, double N, I, double E, L-A-I, N-E-Y
Don’t miss my upcoming queer mini docu-series!

Almost 600 subscribers!! Go subscribe now! Or don’t!! Be like that then!

http://youtube.com/theannieelainey

A, double N, I, double E, L-A-I, N-E-Y

Don’t miss my upcoming queer mini docu-series!

Typecast: A Royals (Lorde) Parody

3 Non-White Actresses Show Up To An Audition…

Alright, here it goes, even the creator of Stop Hating Your Body has some bad days; my BDD will attack from time to time (SO much less than when I was younger) and it affects my self esteem and triggers my depression.
When this happens, I remedy accordingly; if I need to be alone, I find a way to do so, if I need some reassurance, I reach out. One of the things that helps me most recently, is the now popular “selfie culture”. Getting pictures of myself in a private, safe environment, and getting a good look at the reality of my body. The rolls, the cellulite, my fat tummy, the scars on my arms; take it all in, and remind myself of the beauty of being human. 
The beauty of being human is the infinite amount of different ways we can look; different heights, widths, shapes, colors, sizes of parts, numbers of parts, and there is no right or wrong way to have a body. 
Our bodies are our shells, what’s important is who we are. 
I love my shell. I love my body, more importantly I love myself. Sometimes I just need the reminder.
I found my self love! You can find yours too!! :)

Alright, here it goes, even the creator of Stop Hating Your Body has some bad days; my BDD will attack from time to time (SO much less than when I was younger) and it affects my self esteem and triggers my depression.

When this happens, I remedy accordingly; if I need to be alone, I find a way to do so, if I need some reassurance, I reach out. One of the things that helps me most recently, is the now popular “selfie culture”. Getting pictures of myself in a private, safe environment, and getting a good look at the reality of my body. The rolls, the cellulite, my fat tummy, the scars on my arms; take it all in, and remind myself of the beauty of being human. 

The beauty of being human is the infinite amount of different ways we can look; different heights, widths, shapes, colors, sizes of parts, numbers of parts, and there is no right or wrong way to have a body. 

Our bodies are our shells, what’s important is who we are. 

I love my shell. I love my body, more importantly I love myself. Sometimes I just need the reminder.

I found my self love! You can find yours too!! :)

vegannvagina:

Feminist Frequency on race and casting for The Hunger Games

think HARD about that: not only did they white-wash Katniss, they EXPLICITLY PROHIBITED WoC TO AUDITION FOR THE ROLE OF KATNISS. Smells like blatant racism.

marfmellow:

The first thing you really need to understand is that the definition of racism that you probably have (which is the colloquial definition: “racism is prejudice against someone based on their skin color or ethnicity”) is NOT the definition that’s commonly used in anti-racist circles.The definition used in anti-racist circles is the accepted sociological definition (which is commonly used in academic research, and has been used for more than a decade now): “racism is prejudice plus power”. What this means, in easy language:A. Anyone can hold “racial prejudice” — that is, they can carry positive or negative stereotypes of others based on racial characteristics. For example, a white person thinking all Asians are smart, or all black people are criminals; or a Chinese person thinking Japanese people are untrustworthy; or what-have-you. ANYONE, of any race, can have racial prejudices.
B. People of any race can commit acts of violence, mistreatment, ostracizing, etc., based on their racial prejudices. A black kid can beat up a white kid because he doesn’t like white kids. An Indian person can refuse to associate with Asians. Whatever, you get the idea.C. However, to be racist (rather than simply prejudiced) requires havinginstitutional power. In North America, white people have the institutional power. In large part we head the corporations; we make up the largest proportion of lawmakers and judges; we have the money; we make the decisions. In short, we control the systems that matter. “White” is presented as normal, the default. Because we have institutional power, when we think differently about people based on their race or act on our racial prejudices, we are being racist. Only white people can be racist, because only white people have institutional power.
D. People of color can be prejudiced, but they cannot be racist, because they don’t have the institutional power. (However, some people refer to intra-PoC prejudice as “lateral racism”. You may also hear the term “colorism”, which refers to lighter-skinned PoC being prejudiced toward darker-skinned PoC.) However, that situation can be different in other countries; for example, a Japanese person in Japan can be racist against others, because the Japanese have the institutional power there. But in North America, Japanese peoplecan’t be racist because they don’t hold the institutional power.E. If you’re in an area of your city/state/province that is predominantly populated by PoC and, as a white person, you get harassed because of your skin color, it’s still not racism, even though you’re in a PoC-dominated area. The fact is, even though they’re the majority population in that area, they still lack the institutional power. They don’t have their own special PoC-dominated police force for that area. They don’t have their own special PoC-dominated courts in that area. The state/province and national media are still not dominated by PoC. Even though they have a large population in that particular area, they still lack the institutional power overall.F. So that’s the definition of racism that you’re likely to encounter. If you start talking about “reverse racism” you’re going to either get insulted or laughed at, because it isn’t possible under that definition; PoC don’t have the power in North America, so by definition, they can’t be racist. Crying “reverse racism!” is like waving a Clueless White Person Badge around.

marfmellow:

The first thing you really need to understand is that the definition of racism that you probably have (which is the colloquial definition: “racism is prejudice against someone based on their skin color or ethnicity”) is NOT the definition that’s commonly used in anti-racist circles.

The definition used in anti-racist circles is the accepted sociological definition (which is commonly used in academic research, and has been used for more than a decade now): “racism is prejudice plus power”. What this means, in easy language:

A. Anyone can hold “racial prejudice” — that is, they can carry positive or negative stereotypes of others based on racial characteristics. For example, a white person thinking all Asians are smart, or all black people are criminals; or a Chinese person thinking Japanese people are untrustworthy; or what-have-you. ANYONE, of any race, can have racial prejudices.


B. People of any race can commit acts of violence, mistreatment, ostracizing, etc., based on their racial prejudices. A black kid can beat up a white kid because he doesn’t like white kids. An Indian person can refuse to associate with Asians. Whatever, you get the idea.

C. However, to be racist (rather than simply prejudiced) requires havinginstitutional power. In North America, white people have the institutional power. In large part we head the corporations; we make up the largest proportion of lawmakers and judges; we have the money; we make the decisions. In short, we control the systems that matter. “White” is presented as normal, the default. Because we have institutional power, when we think differently about people based on their race or act on our racial prejudices, we are being racist. Only white people can be racist, because only white people have institutional power.

D. People of color can be prejudiced, but they cannot be racist, because they don’t have the institutional power. (However, some people refer to intra-PoC prejudice as “lateral racism”. You may also hear the term “colorism”, which refers to lighter-skinned PoC being prejudiced toward darker-skinned PoC.) However, that situation can be different in other countries; for example, a Japanese person in Japan can be racist against others, because the Japanese have the institutional power there. But in North America, Japanese peoplecan’t be racist because they don’t hold the institutional power.

E. If you’re in an area of your city/state/province that is predominantly populated by PoC and, as a white person, you get harassed because of your skin color, it’s still not racism, even though you’re in a PoC-dominated area. The fact is, even though they’re the majority population in that area, they still lack the institutional power. They don’t have their own special PoC-dominated police force for that area. They don’t have their own special PoC-dominated courts in that area. The state/province and national media are still not dominated by PoC. Even though they have a large population in that particular area, they still lack the institutional power overall.

F. So that’s the definition of racism that you’re likely to encounter. If you start talking about “reverse racism” you’re going to either get insulted or laughed at, because it isn’t possible under that definition; PoC don’t have the power in North America, so by definition, they can’t be racist. Crying “reverse racism!” is like waving a Clueless White Person Badge around.

jazzy-blue-devil:

Real talk: After eighteen years of non-blacks saying that they want to see my hair “really really straight, like theirs,” I’m in a place where the exact opposite is admired and even a bit envied- by non-black people! I mean, you don’t understand how crazy it is, how wonderful it is, to be in a place where natural hair of all sorts is loved, unless you’ve been told that your hair ought to be more like an Asian’s or a white girl’s- less wild and frizzy and soulful. This is a society where it is often the case that a black girl has to take on non-black physical traits in order to be considered beautiful by her peers: to find so many people here who are not black and are perfectly fine with everything about my looking like a black girl is somewhat surprising- and very refreshing.

I’ve had friends and strangers alike come up to me asking how I do this to my hair, fluffing it, saying it’s amazing. And honestly, I can’t help but agree- thi

s is how I love my hair. This is what suits me. And to my fellow black girls- do what you want with your hair. Straightened is fine, natural is fine, but make sure you do YOU. Black girls are just as beautiful as the girls of any other race: don’t you ever forget it.